BREAKING NEWS: SLV WATER DISTRICT CONSIDERING RATE INCREASE FOR MOST CUSTOMERS

SLV Water

Miller Maxfield, the PR Agency that Boulder Creek residents ultimately pay for (through our water bill), has just issued a “strategically-timed Friday afternoon press release.” (this is what government entities do when they don’t want people to notice news.. it’s called the “Friday News Dump” )

The SLV Water District is holding a special board meeting next Thurs, 7/13 to consider a rate restructuring, which would result in increase for most customers and a decrease for some.

If the Board of Directors chooses to pursue the proposed rate restructuring, the District would follow California’s voter-mandated Proposition 218 process. The Prop 218 process requires the District to notify ratepayers of the proposed increase, provide a 45-day period during which ratepayers can submit a letter of protest and hold a public hearing at the end of the 45-day period, at which time a decision would be made by the Board regarding the proposed rate restructuring.

Full Press Release from our PR Agency hired by the SLV Water District is below….

 

SLV WATER DISTRICT TO CONSIDER RATE RESTRUCTURING TO FUND CAPITAL PROJECTS AND BUILD EMERGENCY RESERVES AT SPECIAL BOARD MEETING 7/13 @ 6PM

PUBLIC INPUT SOUGHT; MEETING TO BE HELD AT HIGHLANDS PARK SENIOR CENTER IN BEN LOMOND

JULY 7, 2017 — BOULDER CREEK, CA — The San Lorenzo Valley Water District (SLVWD) today announced it will hold a special board meeting to receive public input and consider whether to move forward with a proposed rate restructuring. The restructured rates would simplify existing rate tiers and produce additional revenue to be invested in ongoing capital improvement projects throughout the District service area as well bolster as the District’s emergency reserve funds.

The special board meeting will take place Thursday, July 13 at 6:00p.m. at Highlands Park Senior Center, 8500 Hwy 9 in Ben Lomond.

The District’s capital improvement projects have been prioritized through a public process. The projects focus on repairs and improvements to the District’s aging infrastructure, such as fire protection capacity, leaking tanks and pumps and water mains prone to failure. Most customers would see an increase in their rates, though some customers who use very little water would see a decrease in their rates.

“Based on current rates, we have enough yearly revenue to adequately cover operational expenses, but not enough to cover ongoing capital improvement costs or grow rainy day reserves,” said Brian Lee, SLVWD District Manager. “To help us understand where we stand, what our needs are and how we can prepare for the future, the District has engaged with the community and key experts to complete three important studies over the past year including a cost of service study, a prioritization of capital improvement projects and a comprehensive rate study. The Board now has an opportunity to discuss whether or not to ask our ratepayers to consider a rate restructuring that would produce ongoing funding for capital improvement projects.”

If the Board of Directors chooses to pursue the proposed rate restructuring, the District would follow California’s voter-mandated Proposition 218 process. The Prop 218 process requires the District to notify ratepayers of the proposed increase, provide a 45-day period during which ratepayers can submit a letter of protest and hold a public hearing at the end of the 45-day period, at which time a decision would be made by the Board regarding the proposed rate restructuring.

 

 

In the News: Rescue of old, blind dog cheers San Lorenzo Valley

Ryan Master’s at the Santa Cruz Sentinel has covered the recent search and rescue of a beloved Boulder Creek dog. From the article:

“At the end of one of the darkest, wettest winters in memory, a bright spot has lit up the San Lorenzo Valley community in the form of an old, blind dog who went missing in the mountains for seven days.”

 

Click HERE to read the full article.

 

Press Release: San Lorenzo Valley Water District Sustains Water Service During Storms

Below is an update on conditions and work from the San Lorenzo Valley Water District. Of note, total rainfall for this year is 42.5 inches and counting….

 

slv-water

 

San Lorenzo Valley Water District Sustains Water Service During Storms

 

BOULDER CREEK, CA – The San Lorenzo Valley Water District (SLVWD) today announced is has no current storm-related disruptions in water service, despite recording more than 8 inches of rain since the storms started on Saturday.

The District has received 8.17 inches of rain since Saturday, bringing the total rainfall for the current water year (Oct. 1, 2016 to Sept. 30, 2017) to 42.56 inches. During the 2015-16 water year, the District recorded 49.47 inches of rain.

“So far, so good,” Operations Manager Rick Rogers said Tuesday. “Right now we have no water outages and no special use restrictions.”

The most significant storm damage the District sustained since storms began pummeling the San Lorenzo Valley on Saturday was a rupture to a main pipeline running under Bear Creek Road. The pipe was damaged when a large section of the road was washed away Sunday night. SLVWD crews rerouted water service in the area through a bypass pipe that connects around the damaged area of the water line. Rogers expected that work to be done by end-of-day Tuesday. A permanent fix will be put in place when the County repairs the road.

District crews also have been managing power issues in some areas, relying on generators to operate key equipment during power outages. Some pumps normally controlled by automated systems have been damaged by the storm and are being operated manually. Crews also are navigating around downed trees, but no roads essential to providing water service have been closed.

Surface water intakes were shut off earlier in the week due to turbidity (typical as a consequence of muddy river water) and the District is relying on well water to supply customers. Rogers said District water tanks remain more than 75 percent full and there are no water quality issues or special use restrictions affecting customers.

Customers are encouraged to prepare for water emergencies by conserving water during power outages because water pumping is powered by generators at that time and is limited. During an outage, water should only be used for health and safety purposes. The American Red Cross recommends storing 1 gallon per day, per person of water in case of emergency, and for people to have a three-day supply of drinking water available.

%d bloggers like this: